Best Critical Care News this Month

Upvote Story 26
This recently released practically oriented book provides an up-to-date overview of all significant aspects of the pathogenesis of sepsis and its management, including within the ICU. Readers will find information on the involvement of the coagulation and endocrine systems during sepsis and on the use of biomarkers to diagnose sepsis and allow early intervention. International clinical practice guidelines for the management of sepsis are presented,... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 15
Norepinephrine in Septic Shock
Norepinephrine (NE) is both an alpha1- and beta1-agonist, and is therefore able to increase vascular tone and contractility. Recent guidelines recommend NE as the first-line vasopressor in septic shock. However, because septic shock is a syndrome that results from a variable combination of decreased venous return, myocardial depression and decreased vascular tone, the place for NE in initial resuscitation is not straightforward. There is no... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 15
Critically ill patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage show a strong association between hyperchloremia and acute kidney injury as well as acute kidney injury and mortality. Of 1,267 patients included in this cohort, 16.7% developed acute kidney injury, as defined by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcome criteria (changes in creatinine only). Compared to patients without acute kidney injury, patients with acute kidney injury had a higher prevalence... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 14
Nurses handle supplementary oxygen to intensive care unit (ICU) patients as part of their daily practice. To secure patients of optimal and safe care, knowledge of nurses’ perception of this practice, including influencing factors for adjusting oxygenation levels is essential. This study aimed to explore intensive care nurses’ perception of handling oxygenation and of factors that govern and influence this practice. A mixed methods approach... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 14
As with anything in medical field, there are so many resources that it is difficult and time consuming to determine which ones are the most valuable and worth reading. Therefore, we decided to compile a list of the Best Critical Care books any intensivist should consider. Here is a compilation of best sellers and few hidden gems that are trending in the healthcare industry now. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 13
Manual of ICU Procedures is a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to intensive care procedures. The book is divided into four anatomical sections, and a final miscellaneous section. Section one covers airway and respiratory, followed by; vascular and cardiac; neurological; gastrointestinal, abdominal, and genitourinary procedures. Each section covers an extensive range of procedures, and each chapter begins with basic principles before describing the procedure step-by-step. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 12
Early enteral nutrition (EEN), typically started within 48 h after ICU admission, is recommended to be superior over delayed enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition. The ESICM Working Group on Gastrointestinal Function provided clinical practice guidelines on EEN and suggested to initiate it at a low rate, as beneficial effects regarding infection prevention have been demonstrated in critically ill patients, as well as in patients with... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 12
The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as “Laura’s Line.” They were a bit wild: smart, funny, disrespectful of authority, but also caring and incredibly committed to their jobs. Laura set the tone with her quick remarks. Frances, from Newfoundland, was famous for her improvised recipes. Justine, the union... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 11
Fundamental concepts of respiratory physiology and the day-to-day duties of a respiratory care professional. Utilizing the wide degree of topics covered, including airway management, understanding ventilator waveforms, and addressing critical care issues, readers have the best resource available for understanding mechanical ventilation and its clinical application. Enhancing the learning experience are valuable illustrations of concepts and equipment, highlighted key points, and self-assessment questions in NRBC... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 11
This NEW book is meant to be a reference for both the new and experienced point of care sonographer; to be a pocket guide to carry with you during your shift. We have included our best tips, tricks and any additional information that we have found helpful along our own journey towards point of care ultrasound nirvana. Throughout this book you will find helpful measurements... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 10
Although there are limited studies investigating the safety and efficacy of an intermittent rather than continuous feeding regimen in critically ill adults, there are several theoretical advantages. Further studies should investigate these and in the meantime, feeding regimens should be devised based on individual patient factors. Few studies have investigated the effect of intermittent feeding over continuous feeding. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 10
This book discusses mechanical ventilation in emergency settings, covering the management of patients from the time of intubation until transfer to the ICU. It provides an introduction to key concepts of physiology pertinent to mechanical ventilation as well as a review of the core evidence-based principles of ventilation. The text highlights the management of mechanical ventilation for critically ill patients with several conditions commonly encountered... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 10
Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) result in excess morbidity, mortality, and resource consumption. Immobilized, ventilator-dependent ICU patients are at the highest risk of HAI. Despite broad implementation of relevant bundles, HAI incidence in our neuro ICU remained high, particularly catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) and ventilator-associated events (VAEs). We reviewed the administrative data and nosocomial infection markers (NIMs) for all neurology and cranial neurosurgery patients admitted to... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 10
Patients who survive acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) often leave ICU with debilitating mental, physical, or cognitive problems that may limit their quality of life. These challenges are called post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). The survivors may live with long-term effects, including permanent lung damage and different degrees of physical, cognitive, and mental health problems. Now, a new study of 645 ARDS survivors by researchers at... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 9
A high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is a high-flow oxygen supply device developed in recent years and is increasingly being used to treat acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) in intensive care unit (ICU). Patients with pre-existing chronic lung disease (CLD) often develop AHRF and require ICU admission. HFNC therapy is also used for these patients in clinical practice, although few studies have examined its efficacy. We... Read More | Comment