Recent Critical Care News

Upvote Story 9
If you think you don’t have viruses, think again. It may be hard to fathom, but the human body is occupied by large collections of microorganisms, commonly referred to as our microbiome, that have evolved with us since the early days of man. I am a physician-scientist studying the human microbiome by focusing on viruses, because I believe that harnessing the power of bacteria’s ultimate... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 21
Hot off the presses. Concise book on PICS, PICS-F and FICUS. Neuropsychiatric problems after critical illness are receiving increasing attention, particularly in the critical care medicine literature, but mental health and primary care clinicians should also be interested in these common problems, given the growing number of critical illness survivors who need care. Patients frequently come out of the intensive care unit (ICU) with horrifying... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
This free eBook presents emergent clinical situations and the core tasks required of healthcare professionals needing to recognize, navigate and safely manage them. It’s really about how to perform the ABCs while protecting yourself, the patient and others; attempting to establish therapeutic relationships; and respecting patients’ values and wishes. When first called upon to manage acutely ill patients, the healthcare team must initiate their ABCs... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 12
A valuable resource for certification preparation and the daily nutrition care of pediatric patients focusing on the importance of nutrition to the growth and development of children. Written with an interdisciplinary evidence-based approach, it is designed to meet the educational needs of any discipline involved in the nutrition care of pediatric patients. This edition features 37 fully revised and updated chapters and is designed to... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 11
Following the new ESPEN Standard Operating Procedures, the previous guidelines to provide best medical nutritional therapy to critically ill patients have been updated. These guidelines define who are the patients at risk, how to assess nutritional status of an ICU patient, how to define the amount of energy to provide, the route to choose and how to adapt according to various clinical conditions. When to... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
Cognitive impairment (CI) is an important but an under-recognized extra-pulmonary feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is related to the burden of disability, worse health outcomes and impaired self-management. Areas covered: CI includes deterioration of a wide range of cognitive functions, such as memory and various executive functions. Risk of hospitalization might be higher in patients with COPD compared to those without, with... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 7
The field of research related to neurocritical care has grown significantly in recent years, and the clinical demands for current and dependable expertise has followed suit. It can be a challenge for the neurocritical practitioner to keep up with cutting-edge evidence-based research and best practices, especially regarding the role of pharmacotherapeutics. In the treatment of neurocritical disease states, pharmacotherapeutic strategies are increasingly relevant. Neuropharmacotherapy in... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Stressful by nature, the intensive care unit (ICU) inevitably faces conflicts due to immediate and cohesive action from physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and advanced practitioners. In an effort to help improve the ICU’s taxing environment, a team of investigators has created a conflict management education intervention, which was released at the 2018 CHEST Annual Meeting in San Antonio, TX. Specifically, the team focused on 4... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
This is a retrospective cohort study describing 86 admissions to the ICU for alcohol withdrawal between 2011-2015. 86% were treated with benzodiazepines before ICU admission, usually on the general ward. The average dose of benzodiazepine before ICU admission was equivalent to 23 mg of lorazepam. Following ICU admission, all benzodiazepines were discontinued and patients were treated solely with IV phenobarbital. Doses of 130 mg IV... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
Critical care transesophageal echocardiography is feasible, safe, and has clinical utility. It can be safely and effectively performed by fellows within the context of their critical care training with faculty supervision. Pulmonary critical care fellowship training programs should consider introducing critical care transesophageal echocardiography as a useful clinical tool. The examination was feasible in all patients in whom it was attempted, and there were no... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
This study suggests that with triiodothyronine (T3) supplementation there was evidence of serum free T3 normalization without evidence of associated harms. A definitive trial is needed to evaluate clinical effectiveness. Data were extracted from the medical records of 70 consecutive patients. All had baseline serum free T3 concentrations below the lower limit of our laboratory’s reference range and 22 (31%) patients also had low thyroxine... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) describes new or worsening impairments of physical, cognitive or mental health resulting from an episode of critical illness and its treatment and lasting after discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU). The incidence of PICS varies based on the domain impacted, ranging from up to 25% for physical and cognitive and up to 60% for psychiatric disturbances. Even as we continue... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
The trajectory of recovery from critical illness is often portrayed as a continuum. At one extremity lies an unstable patient dependent on life-sustaining treatments in the intensive care unit. At the other extremity stands an independent community-dwelling individual with restored personal, social and cultural wellbeing. A progressive transition from illness to recovery reflected by gradual de-intensification of healthcare occurs over many weeks to months. This... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 9
From a large panel of leukocyte biomarkers, immunosuppression biomarkers were associated with subsequent sepsis in ED patients with suspected acute infection. Between January 2014 and February 2016, we recruited 272, 59 and 75 patients to cohorts 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Of 47 leukocyte biomarkers, 14 were non‑reliable, and 17 did not discriminate between the three cohorts. Discriminant analyses for predicting sepsis within cohort‑1 were... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Qualitative data corroborated that residents need more exposure to clinical cases, especially regarding DCD donors. A standardized education curriculum would be beneficial for all residents within the ICU. Developing a better shared understanding of the donation process will improve team communication and performance, translate into a better end-of-life experience for families, and potentially result in increased donation rates. We undertook a qualitative multicentre study and... Read More | Comment