Recent Critical Care News

Upvote Story 5
Intensivists may get all the credit, but over 37,000 hospitalists provide much of the care for ICU patients in the U.S. According to a recent survey, they often do it without the presence or availability of intensivists for consultation or support, especially outside urban centers. The internists aren’t happy about it, feeling uncomfortable, unsupported and forced to practice beyond their scope of training and expertise. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 14
Decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and dysregulated lipid oxidation contribute to compromised skeletal muscle bioenergetic status. In addition, intramuscular inflammation was associated with impaired anabolic recovery with lipid delivery observed as bioenergetically inert. Future clinical work will focus on these key areas to ameliorate acute skeletal muscle wasting. From day 1 to 7, there was a reduction in mitochondrial beta-oxidation enzyme concentrations, mitochondrial biogenesis markers. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 25
A fundamental and respected resource book in critical care, The ICU Book, continues to provide the current and practical guidance that have made it the best-selling text in critical care. The text addresses both the medical and surgical aspects of critical care, delivering the guidance needed to ensure sound, safe, and effective treatment for patients in intensive care regardless of the specialty focus of the... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
Medical errors contribute to an estimated 100,000 to 200,000 deaths per year, according to the Institute of Medicine. Burnout — defined as emotional exhaustion or depersonalization — occurs in more than half of doctors, according to the study. Researchers surveyed physicians across the country to understand the relationship between burnout and major medical errors in their careers. Their findings, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, suggest... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Several studies nowadays prove the physiological benefits of neurally adjusted ventilatory assist, as opposed to the conventional modes of partial support. Whether these advantages translate into improvement of clinical outcomes remains to be determined. Compared with pressure support, neurally adjusted ventilatory assist has been shown to improve patient–ventilator interaction and synchrony in patients with the most challenging respiratory system mechanics, such as very low compliance... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 7
A unique question-and-answer book for surgical residents and trainees that covers all surgical aspects of critical care and acute or emergency medicine. This is a comprehensive, one-of-a-kind question-and-answer text for medical professionals and apprentices concentrating on the growing subspecialty of surgery in critical care and emergency surgery. Covering all surgical aspects of critical care and acute or emergency surgery, it is an ideal learning and... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 15
Teleologically, the mammalian brain has evolved to be the central component of life. It coordinates afferent and efferent neural pathways, integrates neurohormonal responses and, in humans, produces higher cortical effects that augment developmental and protective processes. Despite this vital role for human survival, the brain is profoundly vulnerable to injury and is in many ways set up to fail with devastating consequences for the patient.... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 9
Early application of high-volume haemofiltration (HVHF) benefits patients with severe burns, especially for those with a greater burn area (≥ 80% TBSA), decreasing the incidence of sepsis and mortality. This effect may be attributed to its early clearance of inflammatory mediators and the recovery of the patient’s immune status. Adults patients with burns ≥ 50% total burn surface area (TBSA) and in whom the sum of deep... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 12
This book describes current, evidence-based guidelines for damage control interventions across the field of trauma care with the aim of enabling clinicians to apply them to best effect in daily clinical practice. Emphasis is placed on the need for trauma surgeons and their teams to recognize that optimal damage control in severely traumatized patients depends upon the combination of immediate assessment, resuscitation, and correct surgical... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
Elective general surgery appears to be comparably safe at any time of the workday, any day of the workweek, and in any month of the year. The binary outcomes of 32,001 elective general surgical patients at the Cleveland Clinic between January 2005 and September 2010 were analyzed according to the hour of the day (6 am to 7 pm), day of the workweek, month of... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 14
In this multicentre, randomised, double‑blinded trial, we observed no difference in mortality between terlipressin and NE infusion in patients with septic shock. Patients in the terlipressin group had a higher number of serious adverse events. Patients with septic shock recruited from 21 intensive care units in 11 provinces of China were randomised (1:1) to receive either terlipressin (20–160 µg/h with maximum infusion rate of 4... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
Combined biomarkers predict risk for 14-day and total mortality among subjects with suspected sepsis. Serum amyloid P and tissue plasminogen activator demonstrated the best discriminatory ability in this cohort. Fourteen-day mortality was 12.9%, and total in-hospital mortality was 29.5%. Serum amyloid P was significantly lower (4/4 timepoints) and tissue plasminogen activator significantly higher (3/4 timepoints) in the 14-day mortality group, and the same pattern held... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Although there are limited studies investigating the safety and efficacy of an intermittent rather than continuous feeding regimen in critically ill adults, there are several theoretical advantages. Further studies should investigate these and in the meantime, feeding regimens should be devised based on individual patient factors. Few studies have investigated the effect of intermittent feeding over continuous feeding. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
Early RRT initiation strategy was not associated with any improvement of 60-day mortality in patients with severe acute kidney injury and septic shock or Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Unnecessary and potentially risky procedures might often be avoided in these fragile populations. Subgroups were defined according to baseline characteristics: sepsis status (Sepsis-3 definition), ARDS status (Berlin definition), Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 (SAPS 3), and... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 7
Graduating residents moving on and new interns, fresh out of medical school with their clean and crisp long white coats, moving in. Out with the old, in with the new! The ICU rotation for medicine residents and medical students is stressful under the best of circumstance but always an additional challenge early in July. I remember as a resident, trying to glean from my peers... Read More | Comment