Tag: book

Upvote Story 31
A former paramedic’s visceral, poignant, and mordantly funny account of a decade spent on Atlanta’s mean streets saving lives and connecting with the drama and occasional beauty that lies inside catastrophe. In the aftermath of 9/11 Kevin Hazzard felt that something was missing from his life—his days were too safe, too routine. A failed salesman turned local reporter, he wanted to test himself, see how... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 18
With a focus on evidence-based, state-of-the-art information throughout, the eighth edition of Irwin and Rippe’s Intensive Care Medicine offers authoritative guidance to the wide variety of specialty physicians and non-physicians practicing in the adult intensive care environment. This comprehensive textbook covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of the field, and has been completely updated to provide encyclopedic, interprofessional coverage to support practitioners in every... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 14
Under the direction of Marc S. Sabatine, MD, MPH, Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Pocket Medicine provides the key information a clinician needs for the initial approach and management of the most common inpatient medical problems and the foundational knowledge students and residents need to get through the day. Designed as a life-saver for Rounds, the Pocket Series serves as a practical, high-yield reference... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 19
A comprehensive and contemporary summary of the treatment and post-operative management of traumatic injuries. The concise format makes it ideally suited for everyday use, and new, full-color illustrations highlight the most important aspects of urgent surgical care, including ventilator management, damage control, noninvasive techniques, imaging, infection control, dealing with mass casualties, and treating injuries induced by chemical and biological agents. Review and access the most... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 22
Featuring a superb compilation of chapters related to nephrology and acid-base disorders derived from Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine, Nineteenth Edition, this concise, full-color clinical companion delivers the latest knowledge in the field backed by the scientific rigor and authority that have defined Harrison’s. You will find 23 chapters from 45 renowned editors and contributors in a carry-anywhere presentation that is ideal for the classroom,... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 36
Not exactly the warm welcome I hoped for. But I was just a naive Wisconsin boy, fresh out of medical school and new to Oakland, California. I chose Highland Hospital for my surgical internship: an entire year filled with sick patients, brutal work hours, more brutal staff surgeons, and flawed attempts to maintain a long-distance relationship. Yet, somehow, it’s a work of nonfictional comedy. I... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 27
In this eye-opening account of life in the ER, Paul Austin recalls how the daily grind of long, erratic shifts and endless hordes of patients with sad stories sent him down a path of bitterness and cynicism. Gritty, powerful, and ultimately redemptive, Something for the Pain is a revealing glimpse into the fragility of compassion and sanity in the industrial setting of today’s hospitals. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 31
With astonishing compassion and candor, leading neurosurgeon Henry Marsh reveals the fierce joy of operating, the profoundly moving triumphs, the harrowing disasters, the haunting regrets and the moments of black humor that characterize a brain surgeon’s life. Do No Harm provides unforgettable insight into the countless human dramas that take place in a busy modern hospital. Above all, it is a lesson in the need... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 23
The House of God is a mesmerizing and provocative novel about Roy Basch and five of his fellow interns at the most renowned teaching hospital in the country. A phenomenon ever since it was published, The House of God was the first unvarnished, unglorified, and uncensored portrait of what training to become a doctor is truly like, in all its terror, exhaustion and black comedy. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 34
A powerful look at a stage IV lung cancer diagnosis through the eyes of a neurosurgeon. When Paul Kalanithi is given his diagnosis he is forced to see this disease, and the process of being sick, as a patient rather than a doctor, the result of his experience is not just a look at what living is and how it works from a scientific perspective,... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 11
The 2017 Critical Care Reviews Book seeks to summarize, critique and put in context the best critical care trials of 2016. Five intensivsts working in Northern Ireland have spent the past year writing this edition. This is available as a free PDF download or at minimum cost for the print version. Critical Care Reviews is a not-for-profit organization. The price is kept as low as... Read More | Comment