Tag: infection

Upvote Story 5
Hospitals are increasingly facing the challenge of cutting costs while also improving clinical outcomes. This is certainly true in the infectious disease sector, as unrecognized or ineffectively treated bacterial infections can lead to sepsis, which can be life-threatening. Sepsis is relatively common: each year in the United States, more than 1.6 million adults develop sepsis and approximately 270,000 people die from it. In fact, sepsis... Read More | Comment
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The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH), as part of the American Reinvestment & Recovery Act of 2009, was created to accelerate the pace of technology diffusion in the American healthcare system. The promulgation of this health policy led to the Meaningful Use incentive program – a $30 billion initiative to transform healthcare delivery in hospitals through the advanced implementation of... Read More | Comment
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PET-CT precisely detected the deep foci of infection about 48 hours prior to the diagnosis of sepsis. The cases reports suggested the use of this image technique in ICU for patients with sepsis of unknown origin. We admitted two critically ill patients for suspected sepsis and altered mental state. As all bacteriological samples were initially sterile, diagnostic workups in both patients led us to suspect... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 13
Recently released, Abdominal Sepsis examines in detail the topic of sepsis, with a focus on intra-abdominal sepsis. Particular attention is devoted to source control in the management of the infection, antimicrobial therapy and sepsis support, which represent the cornerstones of treating patients with this problem. The importance of a multidisciplinary approach is highlighted not only by the instructive and informative sections on the acute manifestations... Read More | Comment
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Patterns and Outcomes Associated With Timeliness of Initial Crystalloid Resuscitation in a Prospective Sepsis and Septic Shock Cohort. Crystalloid was initiated significantly later with comorbid heart failure and renal failure, with absence of fever or hypotension, and in inpatient-presenting sepsis. Earlier crystalloid initiation was associated with decreased mortality. Comorbidities and severity did not modify this effect. The primary exposure was crystalloid initiation within 30 minutes... Read More | Comment
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Proton pump inhibitors are not associated with an increased risk for Clostridium difficile infection in ICU patients, according to the results of a retrospective cohort study. PPI use was not associated with a significant increase in CDI risk among patients who did not receive antibiotics (aHR = 1.56; 95% CI, 0.72-3.35). However, PPI use was actually associated with a lower risk for CDI among patients... Read More | Comment
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Ahsan Akram and colleagues have created a fluorescent imaging probe that can quickly and accurately detect hard-to-trace Gram-negative bacteria (one of the major bacterial groups) in human lungs within minutes. Their first-in-human study, where they successfully used the imaging tool to safely detect infections in hospital patients undergoing ventilation, could streamline the diagnosis of bacterial lung infections and more accurately assess if antibiotics are needed.... Read More | Comment
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Critical illness can disrupt local and systemic mechanisms that protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a condition that may be associated with increased mortality, particularly among patients receiving extracorporeal life support. On the basis of randomized trials performed over a period of 40 years,3 most guidelines recommend preventive therapy with either histamine H2–receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU)... Read More | Comment
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In this cluster randomized multicenter study in 13 European ICUs, decontamination strategies with either antibiotics (SDD or SOD) or CHX mouthwash were not associated with reductions in ICU-acquired BSI with MDRGNB, nor mortality, in ventilated ICU patients when compared with standard care, which included universal daily BWs with CHX during ICU stay and a hand hygiene program. Furthermore, the unitwide prevalence of carriage with antibiotic-resistant... Read More | Comment
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The study by Wittekamp and colleagues in this issue of JAMA evaluating strategies for decontamination of mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) fills an important gap in the evidence regarding these practices. Since the first use of selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) in critically ill patients in the 1980s, the effectiveness of this approach to prevent ICU-acquired infections and reduce... Read More | Comment
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Sepsis resuscitation generally focuses on hemodynamics. Rivers of ink have been spilled writing about oxygen delivery and fluid responsiveness. This is clearly important, but it's possible that our focus on easily observable phenomena has led us to ignore something of equal importance: metabolic resuscitation. We can deliver all the oxygen we want to the tissues, but if the mitochondria are failing it won't work. Clinical... Read More | Comment
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A fungus that thrives in dry soil and warm weather has caused a record number of infections in California. Experts fear climate change will cause it to spread across the western US. Valley fever, a fungal disease that infects an estimated 150,000 people in the US each year and has been on the rise in California. Valley fever, also called coccidioidomycosis, is caused by a... Read More | Comment
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Charlie Hinderliter wasn’t opposed to the flu shot. He didn’t have a problem with vaccinations. He was one of about 53 percent of Americans who just don’t get one. An estimated 80,000 Americans died of the flu, or flu-related complications, last winter, according to initial estimates from CDC presented in September. It was the highest number of flu related deaths in decades, and Hinderliter was... Read More | Comment
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Biomarkers represent an essential tool for identification of patients developing infection and to determine their clinical severity. Procalcitonin (PCT) levels appeared to be correlated with the development of severe bacterial infections. Thus, PCT systematic use has been proposed as part of the diagnostic tools and for monitoring treatment duration, but not all of the potential benefits and limitations of PCT have been investigated. We retrospectively... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 9
If you think you don’t have viruses, think again. It may be hard to fathom, but the human body is occupied by large collections of microorganisms, commonly referred to as our microbiome, that have evolved with us since the early days of man. I am a physician-scientist studying the human microbiome by focusing on viruses, because I believe that harnessing the power of bacteria’s ultimate... Read More | Comment