Tag: infection

Upvote Story 8
This book describes the techniques, strategies, and drugs that have been demonstrated by multicenter randomized trials to influence survival in critically ill patients, defined as those who have acute failure of at least one organ, due to either a pathological condition or a medical intervention, and require intensive care treatment. Each chapter focuses on a specific procedure, device, or drug. The scope is accordingly wide,... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
In 2014, the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommended against the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test used to screen for prostate cancer in healthy men, concluding that it results in substantial harms via biopsies and surgeries that can lead to infections, impotence or urinary incontinence, and does not save men’s lives. “Amazingly, despite thousands and thousands of patients included in randomized controlled trials, there... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 7
This text uses cases to illustrate differential diagnoses of various infectious diseases. Unlike any other book on the market, this book is specifically designed for ease of use and can cater to a variety of medical professionals and their needs. The text features brief cases that allow for quick readability, an appendix particularly designed for cross-referencing cases with common symptoms, exposures, and putative diagnoses, bulleted... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 15
Norepinephrine in Septic Shock
Norepinephrine (NE) is both an alpha1- and beta1-agonist, and is therefore able to increase vascular tone and contractility. Recent guidelines recommend NE as the first-line vasopressor in septic shock. However, because septic shock is a syndrome that results from a variable combination of decreased venous return, myocardial depression and decreased vascular tone, the place for NE in initial resuscitation is not straightforward. There is no... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Hospital mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is approximately 40%, but mortality and trajectory in “mild” acute respiratory distress syndrome (classified only since 2012) are unknown, and many cases are not detected. Approximately 80% of cases of mild acute respiratory distress syndrome persist or worsen in the first week; in all cases, the mortality is substantial (30%) and is higher (37%) in those in... Read More | Comment
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Recent studies suggest that hypotension thresholds in current guidelines might be too low for older patients due to arterial stiffening, possibly leading to insufficient fluid resuscitation. We compared intravenous (IV) fluid volumes that older (≥ 70 years) and younger ( Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 10
Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) result in excess morbidity, mortality, and resource consumption. Immobilized, ventilator-dependent ICU patients are at the highest risk of HAI. Despite broad implementation of relevant bundles, HAI incidence in our neuro ICU remained high, particularly catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) and ventilator-associated events (VAEs). We reviewed the administrative data and nosocomial infection markers (NIMs) for all neurology and cranial neurosurgery patients admitted to... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 7
The utility of steroids in sepsis has been debated passionately for decades. There is hope that steroids might improve mortality, but also fear that they could increase infectious complications. Practice varies widely. What does the data truly indicate? This belief is based on the first modern RCT of stress-dose steroids in sepsis by Annane et al. 2002. This study randomized 299 patients with severe vasopressor-refractory... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 7
When you enter the hospital, probably the last thing that you’re thinking about is the floors. However, an emerging body of research suggests that hospital floors are covered with bacteria and could serve as a potential source of infection. Even if people don’t directly touch the floors, other things that patients, visitors, and staff routinely touch are in contact with the floor. Thus, it’s a... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 14
This clinical casebook provides a comprehensive yet concise state-of-the-art review of adult critical care medicine. Presented in a case-based format, each case focuses on a scenario commonly encountered with an adult patient in the ICU. Case scenarios include management of seizures and acute intracranial hypertension, sepsis, liver failure, brain death, bleeding and thrombosis, and treating hospital acquired infections (HAI) in the ICU. Written by experts... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
Sarah Thebarge, a Yale-trained physician assistant, nearly died of breast cancer at age twenty-seven, but that did not end her deeply felt spiritual calling to medical missions in Africa. Risking her own health, she moved to Togo, West Africa-ranked by the United Nations as the least happy country in the world-to care for sick and suffering patients. Serving without pay in a mission hospital, she... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Patients negative by both Beta-D glucan (BDG) and PCR were unlikely to have Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). In patients with a compatible clinical syndrome for PCP, higher BDG values (>200 pg/mL) were consistently associated with clinically significant PCP infections among PCP PCR positive oncology patients. With PCP PCR alone as the reference method, BDG (≥ 80 pg/mL) had a sensitivity of 69.8% and a specificity of... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
The effect of short-term caloric restriction on gene expression in critically ill patients has not been studied. In this sub-study of the PermiT trial, we examined gene expression patterns in peripheral white blood cells (buffy coat) associated with moderate caloric restriction (permissive underfeeding) in critically ill patients compared to standard feeding. The present study shows that different caloric intake via enteral nutrition lead to differential... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
This well-illustrated book provides detailed guidance on all aspects of physical examination in patients requiring emergency or intensive care. After an introductory section covering basic principles and the recognition of pre-terminal signs, the approach to examination of individual organ systems is clearly explained. Examination schemes are then presented for particular conditions or settings, including respiratory distress, shock, neurological disease, trauma, suspected infection, and cardiac arrest.... Read More | Comment