Tag: nutrition

Upvote Story 12
Early enteral nutrition (EEN), typically started within 48 h after ICU admission, is recommended to be superior over delayed enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition. The ESICM Working Group on Gastrointestinal Function provided clinical practice guidelines on EEN and suggested to initiate it at a low rate, as beneficial effects regarding infection prevention have been demonstrated in critically ill patients, as well as in patients with... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 10
Although there are limited studies investigating the safety and efficacy of an intermittent rather than continuous feeding regimen in critically ill adults, there are several theoretical advantages. Further studies should investigate these and in the meantime, feeding regimens should be devised based on individual patient factors. Few studies have investigated the effect of intermittent feeding over continuous feeding. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
We read with great interest the recent letter to Critical Care by Marik and Hooper. Vitamin C is increasingly recognized as a crucial compound to alleviate morbidity in critically ill patients. Vitamin C concentrations, however, are usually far below normal and even close to “scurvy levels” in this population. Vitamin C also is substantially cleared by continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Significant vitamin C deficiency... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 9
There are only four major indications for fluid administration in the critically ill: resuscitation, maintenance, replacement and nutrition (enteral or parenteral). In this review, a conceptual framework is presented looking at fluids as drugs by taking into account the four D’s (drug selection, dose, duration and de-escalation) and the four phases of fluid therapy within the ROSE concept (resuscitation, optimization, stabilization and evacuation). The four... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
The effect of short-term caloric restriction on gene expression in critically ill patients has not been studied. In this sub-study of the PermiT trial, we examined gene expression patterns in peripheral white blood cells (buffy coat) associated with moderate caloric restriction (permissive underfeeding) in critically ill patients compared to standard feeding. The present study shows that different caloric intake via enteral nutrition lead to differential... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
FMT has become an attractive option to mitigate multiple organ dysfunction in the ICU. This article discusses the physiology, rationale, early experience, and expectations for such therapy in the critically ill patient. The polymeric formulas utilized for enteral nutrition in the ICU are absorbed high in the gastrointestinal tract and may not reach the microbial burden in the cecum where their effect is most needed.... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 10
Changing Care to Improve Surgical Outcomes. In this mini-series of six podcasts sponsored by Abbott Nutrition, the DCRI’s Paul Wischmeyer, MD, EDIC, welcomes distinguished scientists and clinicians from the U.S. and the U.K. to discuss to discuss the role of nutrition in surgery. Episode One: Host Paul Wischmeyer is joined by Thomas Varghese, MD, section head of General Thoracic Surgery at the University of Utah,... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
Studies evaluating exercise and nutrition interventions before elective major surgery in adults are producing encouraging early results, but definitive clinical evidence is currently very limited. Future research should focus on refining interventions, exploring mechanism, and evaluating the interactions between therapies and large-scale clinical effectiveness studies. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
In this short opinion piece, career and consumer advisor Belinda MacLeod-Smith challenges us to consider crucial elements of whole patient care, and how they can be impacted by limiting factors. Caring for someone with ongoing, occasionally acute, health needs means I have a high level of interest when it comes to hospital-based services and the concept of ‘whole patient’ care. My husband and I often... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 15
In this multicentre study, we could not demonstrate any difference between Lp299 and CHX used in oral care procedures regarding their impact on colonisation with emerging potentially pathogenic enteric bacteria in the oropharynx and trachea. Potentially pathogenic enteric bacteria not present at inclusion were identified in oropharyngeal samples from 29 patients in the CHX group and in 31 samples in the probiotic group. One hundred... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 12
This article explores the potential role of nutrition and EMS in maintaining muscle health in critical illness. Within this article, we will evaluate fundamental concepts of muscle wasting and evaluate the effects of EMS, as well as the effects of nutrition therapy on muscle health and the clinical and functional outcomes in critically ill patients. We will also highlight current research gaps in order to... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
In this compelling episode, Professor Paul Wischmeyer, shares some of his experiences as a patient in the ICU. Since he was 15 he has endured multiple hospitalizations and ICU stays for his inflammatory bowel disease. This has given him an excellent vantage point to notice what we as ICU professionals do and say to our patients. And from Paul’s perspective we could do much better.... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
Critical illness can disrupt local and systemic mechanisms that protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a condition that may be associated with increased mortality, particularly among patients receiving extracorporeal life support. On the basis of randomized trials performed over a period of 40 years,3 most guidelines recommend preventive therapy with either histamine H2–receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU)... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
In patients with acute lung injury, compared with full enteral feeding, a strategy of initial trophic enteral feeding for up to 6 days did not improve ventilator-free days, 60-day mortality, or infectious complications but was associated with less gastrointestinal intolerance. Baseline characteristics were similar between the trophic-feeding (n = 508) and full-feeding (n = 492) groups. The full-feeding group received more enteral calories for the... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 12
A valuable resource for certification preparation and the daily nutrition care of pediatric patients focusing on the importance of nutrition to the growth and development of children. Written with an interdisciplinary evidence-based approach, it is designed to meet the educational needs of any discipline involved in the nutrition care of pediatric patients. This edition features 37 fully revised and updated chapters and is designed to... Read More | Comment