Tag: oxygen

Upvote Story 4
If you’re involved in the care of critically unwell patients then you will frequently encounter patients who are shocked. The European Society of Intensive Care Medicine defines shock as; “Life-threatening, generalized form of acute circulatory failure associated with inadequate oxygen utilization by the cells. It is a state in which the circulation is unable to deliver sufficient oxygen to meet the demands of the tissues,... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 14
Nurses handle supplementary oxygen to intensive care unit (ICU) patients as part of their daily practice. To secure patients of optimal and safe care, knowledge of nurses’ perception of this practice, including influencing factors for adjusting oxygenation levels is essential. This study aimed to explore intensive care nurses’ perception of handling oxygenation and of factors that govern and influence this practice. A mixed methods approach... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy may be considered as an initial respiratory therapy for trauma patients with blunt chest injury. High-flow nasal cannula therapy could improve lung aeration as noted by the transthoracic lung ultrasound assessment, and LUS may help the attending physicians identify the usefulness of HFNC therapy and decide whether to continue the use of HFNC therapy or intubate the patient. During the... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
A 36-year-old man was admitted to the intensive care unit with an acute exacerbation of chronic heart failure. His medical history included heart failure with an ejection fraction of 20%, bioprosthetic aortic-valve replacement for bicuspid aortic stenosis, endovascular stenting of an aortic aneurysm, and placement of a permanent pacemaker for complete heart block. An Impella ventricular assist device was placed for management of acute heart... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
In acutely ill adults, high-quality evidence shows that liberal oxygen therapy increases mortality without improving other patient-important outcomes. Supplemental oxygen might become unfavourable above an SpO2 range of 94-96%. These results support the conservative administration of oxygen therapy. 25 randomised controlled trials enrolled 16 037 patients with sepsis, critical illness, stroke, trauma, myocardial infarction, or cardiac arrest, and patients who had emergency surgery. Compared with a... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 9
Among critically ill immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF), high-flow oxygen therapy did not significantly decrease day-28 mortality compared with standard oxygen therapy. Of 778 randomized patients (median age, 64 [IQR, 54-71] years; 259 [33.3%] women), 776 (99.7%) completed the trial. The primary outcome was day-28 mortality. Secondary outcomes included intubation and mechanical ventilation by day 28, Pao2:Fio2 ratio over the 3 days after... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
In this article, we review physiologic principles of global oxygen delivery, and discuss the bedside approach to assessing the adequacy of oxygen delivery in critically ill patients. Although there have been technological advances in the assessment of oxygen delivery, we revisit and emphasize the importance of a ‘tried and true’ method – the physical examination. Also potentially important in the evaluation of oxygen delivery is... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 7
It is a longstanding cultural norm to provide supplemental oxygen to sick patients regardless of their blood oxygen saturation. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis has shown that too much supplemental oxygen increases mortality for medical patients in hospital. Patients randomised to liberal oxygen therapy were more likely to die (risk ratio 1.21 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.43)). The increase in mortality was highest... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
A research expedition to Mount Everest has shed light on the unique physiological basis of adaptations seen in the native Sherpa people, which make them better suited to life at high altitude. This improved understanding, which forms part of new research published in Experimental Physiology, could help improve the treatment of patients with conditions related to reduced levels of oxygen in the blood and tissues.... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 7
High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen delivery has been gaining attention as an alternative means of respiratory support for critically ill patients, with recent studies suggesting equivalent outcomes when compared with other forms of oxygen therapy delivery. The main objective of this review was to extract current data about the efficacy of HFNC in critically ill subjects with or at risk for respiratory failure. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 8
Recently, Murphy and colleagues reported findings from a clinical trial designed to evaluate the effect of home noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with oxygen on time to readmission or death in patients with persistent hypercapnia after an acute chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation. The authors concluded that the addition of home NIV to home oxygen therapy may improve outcomes in patients with severe COPD and persistent... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
Long after the polio vaccine stemmed the disease that once infected thousands of people, a handful of U.S. polio survivors still rely on decades-old iron lung machines to stay alive-and must overcome increasing obstacles to maintain the devices. For polio survivors who have difficulty breathing on their own—or who can’t breathe at all—an iron lung is a critical survival tool. It’s essentially a large metal... Read More | Comment