Tag: oxygen

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In this article, we review physiologic principles of global oxygen delivery, and discuss the bedside approach to assessing the adequacy of oxygen delivery in critically ill patients. Although there have been technological advances in the assessment of oxygen delivery, we revisit and emphasize the importance of a ‘tried and true’ method – the physical examination. Also potentially important in the evaluation of oxygen delivery is... Read More | Comment
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It is a longstanding cultural norm to provide supplemental oxygen to sick patients regardless of their blood oxygen saturation. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis has shown that too much supplemental oxygen increases mortality for medical patients in hospital. Patients randomised to liberal oxygen therapy were more likely to die (risk ratio 1.21 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.43)). The increase in mortality was highest... Read More | Comment
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A research expedition to Mount Everest has shed light on the unique physiological basis of adaptations seen in the native Sherpa people, which make them better suited to life at high altitude. This improved understanding, which forms part of new research published in Experimental Physiology, could help improve the treatment of patients with conditions related to reduced levels of oxygen in the blood and tissues.... Read More | Comment
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High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen delivery has been gaining attention as an alternative means of respiratory support for critically ill patients, with recent studies suggesting equivalent outcomes when compared with other forms of oxygen therapy delivery. The main objective of this review was to extract current data about the efficacy of HFNC in critically ill subjects with or at risk for respiratory failure. Read More | Comment
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Recently, Murphy and colleagues reported findings from a clinical trial designed to evaluate the effect of home noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with oxygen on time to readmission or death in patients with persistent hypercapnia after an acute chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation. The authors concluded that the addition of home NIV to home oxygen therapy may improve outcomes in patients with severe COPD and persistent... Read More | Comment
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Long after the polio vaccine stemmed the disease that once infected thousands of people, a handful of U.S. polio survivors still rely on decades-old iron lung machines to stay alive-and must overcome increasing obstacles to maintain the devices. For polio survivors who have difficulty breathing on their own—or who can’t breathe at all—an iron lung is a critical survival tool. It’s essentially a large metal... Read More | Comment
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Routine use of supplemental oxygen in patients with suspected myocardial infarction who did not have hypoxemia was not found to reduce 1-year all-cause mortality. A total of 6629 patients were enrolled. The median duration of oxygen therapy was 11.6 hours, and the median oxygen saturation at the end of the treatment period was 99% among patients assigned to oxygen and 97% among patients assigned to... Read More | Comment
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In this randomized clinical trial of 116 patients, the addition of home noninvasive ventilation significantly prolonged time to readmission or death from 1.4 months to 4.3 months. Among patients with persistent hypercapnia following an acute exacerbation of COPD, adding home noninvasive ventilation to home oxygen therapy prolonged the time to readmission or death within 12 months. Read More | Comment
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The updated guidance is based on new evidence about how effective prescribing and delivery of emergency oxygen for patients can both improve health and save lives. The 2015 emergency oxygen audit report provides information about how far the NHS has progressed in implementing recommendations from the BTS emergency oxygen guideline, but also highlights where further action is needed. BTS Guideline Group members adhere to the... Read More | Comment
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New research shows that low oxygen therapy is able to eliminate brain lesions developed from mitochondrial dysfunction in mice. Eventually, hypoxia therapy could be used to treat people with similar disorders and maybe even reverse signs of aging in otherwise healthy individuals. Even more exciting was what happened when mice who already had brain lesions were exposed to hypoxic air – after just one month,... Read More | Comment