Tag: pulmonary edema

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We developed a computerized algorithm that accurately detects three types of ventilator dyssynchrony. Double-triggered and flow-limited breaths are associated with the frequent delivery of tidal volumes of greater than 10 mL/kg. Although ventilator dyssynchrony is reduced by deep sedation, potentially deleterious tidal volumes may still be delivered. However, neuromuscular blockade effectively eliminates ventilator dyssynchrony. A total of 4.26 million breaths were recorded from 62 ventilated patients.... Read More | Comment
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The treatment of choice for a pneumothorax is a chest tube, and when the small pig-tail catheter doesn’t do the job, the answer is to replace it with a larger bore – right? Not so fast. The exact mechanism of REPE is not clear. The current theory is that lung expansion leads to increased vascular permeability. Rapid inflow of blood to atelectatic lung segments results... Read More | Comment
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High-flow nasal cannula should be considered a first-line therapy in all patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure not from cardiogenic pulmonary edema and without concomitant hypercapnia. The high flow rate of HFNC offers many advantages over low flow nasal cannula and NRB that include washout of dead space leading to reduction in the work of breathing, better titration of oxygen, heated and humidified gas to promote... Read More | Comment
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Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator potentiation by ivacaftor is a novel therapeutic approach for pulmonary edema. Ivacaftor significantly improved alveolar liquid clearance in isolated pig lung lobes ex vivo and reduced edema in a volume overload in vivo pig model of hydrostatic pulmonary edema. To model hydrostatic pressure-induced edema in vitro, we developed a method of applied pressure to the basolateral surface of alveolar epithelia.... Read More | Comment
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Almost all patients with pulmonary bilateral infiltrates and a PaO2/FIO2 less than or equal to 300 mm Hg under standard oxygen fulfilled the acute respiratory distress syndrome criteria under noninvasive ventilation within the first 24 hours. Their mortality rate was similar to that reported in the Berlin definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Therefore, spontaneous breathing patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome criteria could... Read More | Comment