Tag: sleep

Upvote Story 13
A New York Times bestseller and international sensation, this stimulating and important book is a fascinating dive into the purpose and power of slumber. Walker is a Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology and the director of the Center for Human Sleep Science at the University of California, Berkeley. Walker spent four years writing the book in which he argues that sleep deprivation is linked to... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
Patients’ environmental light exposure in the intensive care unit is consistently low and follows a diurnal pattern. No effect of nighttime light exposure was observed on melatonin secretion. Inadequate daytime light exposure in the ICU may contribute to abnormal circadian rhythms. A total of 67,324 30-second epochs of light data were collected from 17 subjects. Light intensity peaked in the late morning, median 64.1 (interquartile... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Research using questionnaires to assess sleep is commonplace in light of practical barriers to polysomnography or other measures of sleep. A methodologically sound approach to tool development and testing is crucial to gather meaningful data, and this robust approach was lacking in many cases. Further research measuring sleep subjectively in ICU should use the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire, and researchers should maintain a commitment to... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
The environmental and psychological factors affecting intensive care unit patients varied according to age, sex, and educational and surgical status. These factors had adverse effects on the patients. The elimination or modification of these factors would contribute positively to the treatment of intensive care unit patients and shorten their length of stay in the intensive care unit. A total of 98 patients, 80 in the... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
Unlike dementia, which is constant and gets progressively worse, delirium tends to come and go, fluctuating even in the course of a day. The symptoms are transitory, yet for people who develop delirium, it can be the start of a permanent decline in health and independence. Some studies show continued signs of delirium six or 12 months after onset. Some patients never fully bounce back.... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
This study demonstrated that the duration and quality of sleep in hospitalized patients were significantly affected and revealed many potentially modifiable hospital-related factors negatively associated with sleep. Raising awareness about the importance of adequate sleep in the vulnerable hospital population and introducing interventions to target sleep-disturbing factors may improve healing. A total of 2005 patients were included (median age, 68 years; interquartile range, 57-77 years;... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
An ICU-wide quality improvement intervention to improve sleep and delirium is feasible and associated with significant improvements in perceived nighttime noise, incidence of delirium/coma, and daily delirium/coma-free status. Improvement in perceived sleep quality did not reach statistical significance. Primary ICU outcomes were perceived sleep quality and noise ratings (measured on a 0-100 scale using the valid and reliable Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire) and delirium/coma-free days. Secondary... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 14
ICU patients exhibit disturbed sleeping patterns, often attributed to environmental noise, although the relative contribution of noise compared to other potentially disrupting factors is often debated. We therefore systematically reviewed studies of the effects of ICU noise on the quality of sleep to determine to what extent noise explains the observed sleep disruption, using the Cochrane Collaboration method for non-randomized studies. Searches in Scopus, PubMed,... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
Poor sleep is common in the ICU setting and may represent a modifiable risk factor for patient participation in ICU-based physical therapy (PT) interventions. This study evaluates the association of perceived sleep quality, delirium, sedation, and other clinically important patient and ICU factors with participation in physical therapy (PT) interventions. This was a secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of sleep in a single... Read More | Comment