Tag: study

Upvote Story 5
Clinical Sensors, a startup based in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, has been awarded two Small Business Research Grants from the National Institutes of Health. Together, the grants total $1.5 million and are earmarked for sepsis work. The grants will enable the company to continue development and demonstration of its point-of-care device that directly measures a patient's blood nitric oxide level within a few seconds. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
On June 21, 2016, the US government announced changes that are arguably the most significant of the last quarter century concerning the protection of human research participants – a requirement for use of central or single institutional review boards (IRBs) in multisite National Institutes of Health (NIH) – funded research. Specifically, the NIH announced a new policy (effective September 25, 2017) to mandate that nonexempt... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 7
Metabolomics is a tool that has been used for the diagnosis and prognosis of specific diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine if metabolomics could be used as a potential diagnostic and prognostic tool for H1N1 pneumonia. Our hypothesis was that metabolomics can potentially be used early for the diagnosis and prognosis of H1N1 influenza pneumonia. This study demonstrates that H1N1 pneumonia can... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Between March 5, 2009 and January 11, 2011 a randomized, unblinded, controlled group sequential trial of adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of presumed cardiac origin was conducted at three US and two European sites. After EMS providers initiated manual compressions patients were randomized to receive either iA-CPR or M-CPR. Patient follow-up was until all patients were discharged alive or died. The primary outcome, survival to hospital... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
Data analytics have found that large medical facilities have higher rates of death from sepsis than their smaller hospital counterparts. Researchers from Houston Methodist Hospital recently used Big Data analytics to learn more about development and outcomes of sepsis in hospital settings. The results of this study, published in the journal Medical Care, show better understanding of the condition could lead to better outcomes and... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Salicylate-poisoned patients can be incredibly complex and severely ill. Secondary to the significant acid-base abnormalities that can accompany salicylate poisoning, hemodialysis (HD) is sometimes required to facilitate removal and correct acid-base status. In addition, if intubation is needed, hyperventilation on the vent is crucial to match the patient’s minute ventilation prior to insertion of the endotracheal tube. A new study from the Illinois Poison Center... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Current use of azithromycin (Zithromax/Zmax, Pfizer) was linked with a twofold increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia compared with no antibiotic use, but this risk disappeared when azithromycin use was compared with amoxicillin use, in a large European study. These findings from more than 14 million outpatients in five European countries who were part of the Arrhythmogenic Potential of Drugs (ARITMO) study. Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
In this multicenter prospective cohort study involving 879 patients with suspected infection treated at the emergency department, the qSOFA was better at predicting in-hospital mortality with an area under the receiver operating curve (AUROC) of 0.80 than were SIRS (AUROC, 0.65) and severe sepsis (AUROC, 0.65). Among patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected infection, the use of qSOFA resulted in greater prognostic accuracy... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 8
The effect of day of the week on outcome after surgery is the subject of debate. The aim was to determine whether day of the week of emergency general surgery alters short- and long-term mortality. Dr Mike Gillies and Dr Ewen Harrison discuss their recently published study "The effect of day of the week on short- and long-term mortality for emergency general surgery: a population... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
We performed a prospective before-and-after study in all patients admitted to two clinical ward areas in a district general hospital in the UK. We examined the effect on clinical outcomes of deploying an electronic automated advisory vital signs monitoring and notification system, which relayed abnormal vital signs to a rapid response team (RRT). Deployment of an electronic automated advisory vital signs monitoring and notification system... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Creating a nursing workforce that is resilient to occupational stress and burnout is critical for engagement, job satisfaction and retention, as well as the overall success of any healthcare organization. The overall goal with mindfulness interventions is to provide caregivers with practical, easy-to-use tools and resources to build their resilience. There are a number of reasons why mindfulness interventions are preferred over other self-care approaches... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 9
This meta-analysis aimed to examine the impact of antipyretic therapy on mortality in critically ill septic adults. Inclusion criteria were observational or randomized studies of septic patients, evaluation of antipyretic treatment, mortality reported, and English-language version available. Studies were excluded if they enrolled pediatric patients, patients with neurologic injury, or healthy volunteers. Criteria were applied by two independent reviewers. Antipyretic treatment does not significantly improve... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
Telemedicine-Assisted Intubation in Rural Emergency Departments: A National Emergency Airway Registry Study. Intubation in rural emergency departments (EDs) is a high-risk procedure, often with little or no specialty support. Rural EDs are utilizing real-time telemedicine links, connecting providers to an ED physician who may provide clinical guidance. Telemedicine-supported endotracheal intubation performed in rural hospitals is feasible, with good success rates. Future research is required to... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
Multiple factors including nurses' experience and assignments determined how fast they responded when monitoring alarms were triggered in a children's hospital, a video analysis found. Nurses were more likely to respond to physiologic monitor alarms when they had less than one year of experience, when there was a 1 to 1 nursing assignment or, when prior alarms requiring intervention had sounded, reported Christopher P. Bonafide,... Read More | Comment