Tag: technology

Upvote Story 6
ICU doctors are often required to analyse large volumes of complex, heterogeneous data to make life-critical decisions. Artificial Intelligence (AI), if used effectively, could reduce this burden by transforming data into more actionable information. We can use AI to predict adverse outcomes before they happen, better manage highly complex situations, and ultimately allow clinicians to spend less time analyzing data and more time harnessing their... Read More | Comment
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Resuscitated cardiac arrest is associated with high mortality; however, the ability to estimate risk of adverse outcomes using existing illness severity scores is limited. Using in-hospital data available within the first 24 hours of admission, we aimed to develop more accurate models of risk prediction using both logistic regression (LR) and machine learning (ML) techniques, with a combination of demographic, physiologic, and biochemical information. ML... Read More | Comment
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Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) results in substantial mortality but remains underdiagnosed in clinical practice. For this reason, automated “sniffer” systems that analyse electronic records have been developed to assist clinicians with ARDS diagnosis. However, a new systematic review found that these sniffer tools had moderate to high predictive value in their derivation cohorts, indicating that published literature had potential for high risks of bias... Read More | Comment
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Biomedical engineers have developed a smartphone app with the aim of non-invasive detection of anemia. Instead of a blood test, the app uses photos of someone’s fingernails taken on a smartphone to determine whether the level of hemoglobin in their blood seems low. The app is part of the PhD work of former biomedical engineering graduate student Rob Mannino, PhD, who was motivated to conduct... Read More | Comment
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Scientists have taken a step toward building a computer model of the brain’s genome, one that may help clarify the genetic roots of schizophrenia, autism and other disorders. For the past two decades, scientists have been exploring the genetics of schizophrenia, autism and other brain disorders, looking for a path toward causation. If the biological roots of such ailments could be identified, treatments might follow,... Read More | Comment
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Trials in Australia could be signalling the way ahead for a new role for remotely piloted aircraft in the air medical sphere, as James Paul Wallis reports. Drones have long since proved their worth as an aerial search tool and this year have grabbed headlines by assisting in rescues of swimmers in the surf. Could they also assist in responding to trauma alongside traditional HEMS... Read More | Comment
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Medically fragile infants on ventilation support at community or rural hospitals without surgical services sometimes need those services. That poses a challenge for pediatric anesthesiologists who need to assess these babies preoperatively and discuss their anesthesia plan for surgery with their parents without transporting such vulnerable patients. For Joann Hunsberger and Sally Bitzer, anesthesiologists and critical care specialists at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, the answer... Read More | Comment
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Urgent and drastic changes to the rules around medical devices, such as pacemakers, are needed to protect patients, according to the Royal College of Surgeons. It wants a register of every device in every patient set up so doctors know if new innovations are causing harm. An investigation by 58 media organisations has uncovered patients being given implants that were unsafe. Medical devices range from... Read More | Comment
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Breakthrough development uses a patient’s own stomach cells, cutting the risk of an immune response to implanted organs. Israeli researchers report that they have invented the first fully personalized tissue implant, engineered from a patient’s own materials and cells. The new technology makes it possible to engineer any kind of tissue implant, for the spinal cord, to the heart, or brain, from one small fatty... Read More | Comment
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‘Mini brains’ grown in a dish have spontaneously produced human-like brain waves for the first time — and the electrical patterns look similar to those seen in premature babies. The advancement could help scientists to study early brain development. Research in this area has been slow, partly because it is difficult to obtain fetal-tissue samples for analysis and nearly impossible to examine a fetus in... Read More | Comment
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Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a predictive model that could guide clinicians in deciding when to give potentially life-saving drugs to patients being treated for sepsis in the emergency room. Early prediction could, among other things, prevent an unnecessary ICU stay for a patient that doesn’t need vasopressors, or start early preparation for the ICU for a patient that does.... Read More | Comment
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Something’s gone terribly wrong. Doctors are among the most technology-avid people in society; computerization has simplified tasks in many industries. Yet somehow we’ve reached a point where people in the medical profession actively, viscerally, volubly hate their computers. In recent years, it has become apparent that doctors have developed extraordinarily high burnout rates. In 2014, fifty-four per cent of physicians reported at least one of... Read More | Comment
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The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH), as part of the American Reinvestment & Recovery Act of 2009, was created to accelerate the pace of technology diffusion in the American healthcare system. The promulgation of this health policy led to the Meaningful Use incentive program – a $30 billion initiative to transform healthcare delivery in hospitals through the advanced implementation of... Read More | Comment
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The Social Media Index’s correlation with multiple quality evaluation instruments over time supports the hypothesis that it is associated with overall Web site quality. It can play a role in guiding individuals to high-quality resources that can be reviewed with critical appraisal techniques. A total of 309 of 330 raters completed all ratings (93.6%). The Social Media Index correlated moderately to strongly with the mean... Read More | Comment