Upvote Story 5

Computer Tomographic Assessment of Gastric Volume in Major Trauma Patients

Computer Tomographic Assessment of Gastric Volume in Major Trauma Patients

In major trauma patients, overall stomach volume deriving from food, fluids and air must be expected to be around 400–500 mL. Gastric dilation caused by air is common but not typically associated with pre-hospital airway management.

The amount of air in the stomach seems to be associated with the risk of aspiration. Further studies, specifically addressing patients after difficult airway management situations are warranted.

The median (range) total gastric content and air volume was 402 (26–2401) and 94 (0–1902) mL in PHI vs. 466 (59–1915) and 120 (1–997) mL in ERI patients (p = .59 and p = .35).

PHI patients were more severely injured when compared with the ERI group (injury severity score (ISS) 33 (9–75) vs. 25 (9–75); p = .004).

Mortality was higher in the PHI vs. ERI group (26.8% vs. 8.6%, p = .001).

CriticalCare.news
August 4, 2020

Related Books