Tag: CPR

Upvote Story 8
As expected, higher levels of BLS training correlated with better cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality. However, this study showed that ventilations and hands-on time were the components of CPR that were most affected by the level of training. Self-assessments of CPR ability correlated well to actual test performance and may have a role in probing CPR skills in students. The results may be important for BLS... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
The optimum chest compression site (P_optimum) in children is debated: European Resuscitation Council recommends one finger breadth above the xiphisternal joint, whereas American Heart Association proposes the lower sternal half. Theoretically, pediatric P_optimum is located 1 cm (or 0.1 unit of sternal top) above the xiphisternal joint. We defined zero point (0, 0) as the center of the xiphisternal joint designating leftward and upward directions of... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
What happened to Beatrice Weisman before dawn on Aug. 29, 2013, was not supposed to happen: The medical staff at Maryland General Hospital found her in cardiac arrest, resuscitated her and kept her alive. The matriarch of a close-knit family on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Ms. Weisman, then 83, had suffered a serious stroke in June and had spent weeks in two hospitals. Fortunately, she and... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
Is emergency medicine on the verge of “the dawn of a new golden age of resuscitation?” That’s the bold prediction from CPR innovator Keith Lurie, MD, a professor of internal and emergency medicine at the University of Minnesota, a director of the CentraCare Heart and Vascular Center and the founder of Minnesota Resuscitation Solutions. Emergency physicians, EMS personnel, and other experts from around the world... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
Among patients with out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest (OHCA), the use of BMV compared with ETI failed to demonstrate noninferiority or inferiority for survival with favorable 28-day neurological function, an inconclusive result. A determination of equivalence or superiority between these techniques requires further research. This study has several limitations. First, the presence of a physician in the ambulance team may make the results of this study less... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
Multi-system organ failure is ubiquitous but treatable with adequate hemodynamic support. Neurologic recovery was prolonged requiring delayed prognostication. Immediate 24/7 availability of surgical and medical specialty expertise was required to achieve 48% functionally intact survival. Of 100 appropriately transported patients, 83 achieved CICU admission. 40/83 (48%) discharged functionally intact. Multi-system organ failure occurred in all patients. Cardiac, pulmonary, renal, and liver injury improved within 3-4... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
In light of the SCC’s Cuthbertson v. Rasouli decision, the distinction between withdrawing and not offering a medical treatment is increasingly relevant. Because CPR is a “default” treatment for cardiac arrest, it requires a physician order to be withheld. However, the individual components of resuscitation that are clinically indicated are based on physician judgment and best practices. A physician who has assessed a patient and... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 6
With the integration of bedside echocardiography into cardiac arrest, we now have a real-time tool to help us glean some of this critical missing information, as well as offer procedural guidance and prognostic data. However, it can be tough to quickly and accurately utilize POCUS in the stress-filled environment surrounding cardiac arrest. For instance, it can take time to acquire images and interpret them, which... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
Males had an increased likelihood of receiving Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (BCPR) compared with females in public. BCPR improved survival to discharge, with greater survival among males compared with females. Analyzed data from adult, nontraumatic OHCA events within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium registry (2011–2015). Using logistic regression, we modeled the likelihood of receiving BCPR by gender, including patient-level variables, stratified by location. A cohort of 19 331... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 7
A man undergoing CPR, exhibited signs of conscious awareness for 90 minutes before the medical team stopped the life-sustaining procedure, according to a new case report. The 69-year-old man was admitted to a hospital in Denmark in 2016 after three days of indigestion and nausea. Shortly after arriving, he became unconscious and went into cardiac arrest, according to Dr. Rune Sarauw Lundsgaard, an anesthesiologist at... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 5
Authors introduce and offer a protocol of a proposed randomized study enrolling patients with witnessed OHCA presumably of cardiac origin planned to be initiated in Prague in 2012. Study will compare hyperinvasive approach encompassing prehospital intraarrest cooling, mechanical chest compression, veno-arterial ECLS and immediate invasive diagnostics in all patients compared to a standard of care. The protocol is opened for sharing by other cardiac centers... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 17
Laboratory research like Dr. Alam's has helped to provide answers to some of these questions and demonstrated the feasibility of rapidly inducing hypothermia for exsanguinating trauma. Assuming that the pilot trial and follow-up studies are successful, EPR-CAT could be instituted into a small subset of trauma centers — busy ones, Dr. Tisherman said. “Doing something that takes this kind of effort for only one or... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 11
A major heart attack at age 40 sent him to the ICU. Jason Levi aims to help others with life after the ICU. The medical term is post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). The nurses are Jenelle Baer and Janet Nelson. They’re both RNs in the Medical Center of the Rockies Cardiac ICU, and they are the driving force behind an ICU support group that they and... Read More | Comment
Upvote Story 4
There’s a revolution taking place in emergency medical services, and for many, it could be life changing. From the increasingly sophisticated equipment they carry and the new lifesaving techniques they use, to the changing roles they play in some communities—providing preventive care and monitoring patients at home—ambulance crews today are hardly recognizable from their origins as “horizontal taxicabs.” Read More | Comment