Tag: research

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Guiding FFICM and EDIC exam candidates through the intensive care medicine curriculum, this book provides 48 case studies mapped to eight key areas of study in the UK and European syllabuses. Cases include clinical vignettes, explanations and a list of key learning points, while also being formatted along the structure of FICM case reports. Key clinical management points are identified and linked to appropriate scientific... Read More | Comment
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Patients who survive acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) often leave ICU with debilitating mental, physical, or cognitive problems that may limit their quality of life. These challenges are called post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). The survivors may live with long-term effects, including permanent lung damage and different degrees of physical, cognitive, and mental health problems. Now, a new study of 645 ARDS survivors by researchers at... Read More | Comment
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Winner of the National Academy of Sciences Best Book Award “Thinking, Fast and Slow” takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. The impact of overconfidence on corporate strategies, the difficulties of predicting what will make us... Read More | Comment
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This volume focuses on procedures for the development and application of several research animal models and in vitro methods that allow researchers to gain insight into the underlying cellular, biochemical, and physiological mechanisms involved in traumatic and ischemic injury. The chapters in this book discuss topics, such as animal models and techniques commonly used to study traumatic brain injury, hemorrhagic shock, ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes,... Read More | Comment
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When you enter the hospital, probably the last thing that you’re thinking about is the floors. However, an emerging body of research suggests that hospital floors are covered with bacteria and could serve as a potential source of infection. Even if people don’t directly touch the floors, other things that patients, visitors, and staff routinely touch are in contact with the floor. Thus, it’s a... Read More | Comment
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Recent attacks in the UK and elsewhere using powerful nerve agents show that U.S. healthcare providers don’t need to be near a battlefield to find themselves dealing with similar emergencies, researchers argue in a commentary that offers advice on what to do and who to call. The CDC isn’t aware of any potential threats related to the use of nerve agents, but the commentary is... Read More | Comment
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Biomedical engineers have developed a smartphone app with the aim of non-invasive detection of anemia. Instead of a blood test, the app uses photos of someone’s fingernails taken on a smartphone to determine whether the level of hemoglobin in their blood seems low. The app is part of the PhD work of former biomedical engineering graduate student Rob Mannino, PhD, who was motivated to conduct... Read More | Comment
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Despite various technological advances, it still usually takes at least 24 to 48 h to obtain a blood culture result. The subsequent delays in diagnosis and treatment of infection can negatively impact care in the intensive care unit (ICU). Biomarkers, such as procalcitonin (PCT), have been suggested as predictors of blood culture positivity in patients with different diseases. However, the performances of PCT, C-reactive protein (CRP),... Read More | Comment
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This systematic review and meta-analysis, which included only high-level evidence from randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in intensive care settings, revealed that crystalloids were less effective than colloids at stabilizing hemodynamic resuscitation endpoints such as CVP, MAP, and cardiac index. There is a possibility that saline is more effective than balanced crystalloids at reaching resuscitation endpoints; however, the evidence for this was not conclusive and... Read More | Comment
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In a single-site randomized clinical trial of patients hospitalized due to Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a 3-month program that combined transition and long-term self-management support resulted in significantly fewer COPD-related hospitalizations and emergency department visits and better health-related quality of life at 6 months after discharge. Further research is needed to evaluate this intervention in other settings. Among 240 patients who were randomized, 203... Read More | Comment
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Sickle cell disease is common throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa. It affects up to 3% of births in some areas and is associated with very high mortality. Many cases go undiagnosed in regions where there are few resources, because standard methods for diagnosing the disease require sophisticated equipment and reliable electricity. A new test that costs less than $2, requires only a small drop of... Read More | Comment
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Scientists have taken a step toward building a computer model of the brain’s genome, one that may help clarify the genetic roots of schizophrenia, autism and other disorders. For the past two decades, scientists have been exploring the genetics of schizophrenia, autism and other brain disorders, looking for a path toward causation. If the biological roots of such ailments could be identified, treatments might follow,... Read More | Comment
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Dr. Jonathan Sevransky was intrigued when he heard that a well-known physician in Virginia had reported remarkable results from a simple treatment for sepsis. Could the leading cause of death in hospitals really be treated with intravenous vitamin C, the vitamin thiamine and doses of steroids? “Hundreds of thousands of people die in the U.S. every year and millions of people in the world die... Read More | Comment
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Most people have heard about antibiotic-resistant germs. But how about antibiotic-resistant dust? A new Northwestern University study has found that an antimicrobial chemical called triclosan is abundant in dust — and linked to changes in its genetic makeup. The result is dust with organisms that could cause an antibiotic-resistant infection. Hartmann’s study compared dust samples collected from 42 athletic facilities in the Pacific Northwest region.... Read More | Comment
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Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH; Boston, USA), Harvard Medical School (HMS; Boston, MA, USA), and other institutions conducted a trial to see if treating stored packed sheep RBCs with NO before transfusion could prevent PH. To do so, cohort sheep were transfused with autologous RBCs treated with NO and stored for 40 days; control sheep received stored RBCs not exposed to NO. Pulmonary and... Read More | Comment