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Abnormalities in the Host Immune Response During Hospitalization for Sepsis

Abnormalities in the Host Immune Response During Hospitalization for Sepsis

In this cohort study of 483 patients who survived hospitalization with sepsis at 12 US hospitals, 25.8% had elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (a marker of inflammation) at 3 months, 30.2% at 6 months, and 25.6% at 12 months and 46.4% had elevated soluble programmed death ligand 1 levels (a marker of immunosuppression) at 3 months, 44.9% at 6 months, and 49.4% at 12 months.

Two common phenotypes were identified based on these markers, and patients with hyperinflammation and immunosuppression had a higher risk of readmission or death.

Persistent elevation of inflammation and immunosuppression markers is common up to a year in patients who survive hospitalization for sepsis and may be associated with poor long-term outcomes.

This prospective, multicenter cohort study enrolled and followed up for 1 year adults who survived a hospitalization for sepsis from January 10, 2012, to May 25, 2017, at 12 US hospitals.

Persistent elevation of inflammation and immunosuppression biomarkers occurred in two-thirds of patients who survived a hospitalization for sepsis and was associated with worse long-term outcomes.

CriticalCare.news
August 12, 2019

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